Ubre Blanca – The Sadist [Giallo Disco]

The same-named opener as this malevolently titled EP looms appropriately ominously into view with a fair sprinkling of menace: brooding electronic pulses and groans with a sleazy as you like backbeat; depending on your take on things it’s either a thrilling statement of intent or a John Carpenter film playing in the background whilst you have your cornflakes and crack your knuckles in contemplation… I go with the former.

It ain’t shy that’s for sure and neither are the other four tracks featured here.

 

So confident is it that two thirds of the way in it all breaks down and then kerblammo, we’re off – the pace picks up and we shoosh into the hi energy vibe that infects the rest on offer from the two-piece; still buzzing and groaning but thumping along.

In a nutshell that’s what Ubre Blanca are about; solid, scary and ever so worrying electronics, but a battering rhythm section provided by Andy Brown as well.

Track two, ‘The Quarry’, is even better and frankly does sound like one is being stalked by a lurking disco panther from the shadows – apologies to the band if they actually had a slate mine in mind whilst crashing this one out.

The urge to dance and yet also run away is always a welcome combination.

A touchstone – other than Carpenter’s marvellous madness – might at times be parts of the Exorcist soundtrack and track three, ‘Fear of God’, does us the favour of coming mighty close to it at points.

It’s all quite bonkers of course, but give me that over any dreary old indie-by-numbers any day of the week; Christ if you’re going to name yourself after a legendary Cuban cow you’ve got eight points in the bag already.

Tight as you like live prospect too with the other half of the duo, and ex of Shitdisco, Joel Stone abusing various wired boxes and whatnot with the desired degree of reckless bombast.

You won’t hear two people making quite such an impressively sized racket outside of marriage guidance for a couple of opera singers: pissed off opera singers with guns and machinery, that’s what Ubre Blanca sound like [without the libretto right enough – we’re in instrumental (extra mental) territory here].

Dark music for dark people in deliciously dark discotheques: go and be intimidated by this rather unique and rather good music.

Impressively individual.

Words: Vosne LePro

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