Tag Archives: Rustie

Albums of 2015 (20-11)

20-11  –  10-1  –  Tracks & EPs

20 December ’91 - Quebec20 December ’91 – Quebec [Gold Mold]

Probably the only album to make this year’s lists recorded on a mobile phone, Quebec showcases both December ’91’s musicianship and originality. Raw, simple but excellently put together December 91’s music clearly serves as an outlet for his emotions as it touches on a number of personal matters, which are delivered in an equally heartfelt manner. (Jess Lavin)

19 Antique Pony - unalbum19 Antique Pony – unalbum

Completely unique and utterly, strangely, bewitchingly triumphant; unalbum features vocoders, discordant melodies, funk, surf guitar, jarring and angular riffs… and yet it all flows. They may as well be called Unique Pony because there’s bugger all else out there quite like this, not capable of producing such a cohesive blend from wildly divergent ingredients anyway.

18 Idlewild - Everything Ever Written18 Idlewild – Everything Ever Written [Empty Words]

Everything Ever Written encapsulates Idlewild in 2015, the Fugazi fuelled alt rock angst of 100 Broken Windows may be missing, but it more than makes up for it in melodic depth. A surprising, poetic, folk tinged collection of songs that are so well rounded it’s hard to pick a favourite. Idlewild have matured at the same rate as their fans and this record satisfies the huge Scottish rock/pop void left since Readers & Writers. (Andy McGonigle)

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17 Admiral Fallow - Tiny Rewards17 Admiral Fallow – Tiny Rewards [Nettwerk]

Admiral Fallow’s third album Tiny Rewards, is quite simply brilliant. Released three years after their second album, this new collection of songs unravels a band that has come of age. Tiny Rewards is an epiphanic record that fills you with joy; it is also tender, contemplative and intelligent. (Tina Koenig)

16 Lovers Turn To Monsters - Hard To Be Around16 Lovers Turn To Monsters – Hard To Be Around

Fresh and eccentric, delicate and intimate, Hard To Be Around works as a sneak peek into Kyle Wood’s psyche. The album is an obscure trip down the singer’s brightest and darkest sides, mystically keeping you on the edge of your seat after every track. An absolute delight if your mainstream conscious is switched off; a rare piece of raw music, which will provoke emotions in whoever dares to listen.

15 Pinact - Stand Still and Rot15 Pinact – Stand Still and Rot [Kanine]

With their debut LP Pinact have produced a piece of work that fully realises their significant talents. Stand Still and Rot is full of bluster and grace, exploring notions of uncertainty, joy and boredom, spiked with corrosive volume and sweetened with heartening melodies. The album is full of instantly likeable and catchy moments, loads of classy touches and tons more, including more hooks and big choruses than you can shake a stick at.

14 Young Fathers - White Men Are Black Men Too14 Young Fathers – White Men Are Black Men Too [Big Dada]

After winning the Mercury Prize for their 2014 album Dead, Young Fathers immediately travelled to Berlin to finish recording its follow up: White Men Are Black Men Too. The difference in the two albums is night and day. Whilst Dead was polished and gleamed with pop sensibility, WMABMT features lo-fi, raw production that makes use of rattling drum machines and scratchy, hollering vocals. Young Fathers may be the most innovative music group in Scotland, and go about it in a damn cool way. (Greg Murray)

13 Apostille - Powerless13 Apostille – Powerless [Night School]

Powerless. Horrible. Dark. Depressing. Makes you want to kill yourself, but that is the point. Everything is fucked so why not listen to this as you stare at the clock, waiting for it to end… (Paul Choi)

12 Rustie - EVENIFUDONTBELIEVE12 Rustie – EVENIFUDONTBELIEVE [Warp]

It could be said that 2015 was a rough year for Russell Whyte, aka Rustie, with the producer announcing a break from live shows due to “addition and mental health problems”, however one particular high point was the release of EVENIFUDONTBELIEVE; an album that saw him head back his raw beginnings. The album saw Rustie take full creative control, and when we say full we mean FULL; everything here was done by Rustie from the beats to the production to the vocal samples! It may not be the adrenaline pumping club effort many wanted, but it is a highly detailed maximalist release that demonstrates the producer’s prowess. Hopefully he’s not off too long.

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11 Kathryn Joseph - Bones You Have Thrown Me and Blood I’ve Spilled11 Kathryn Joseph – Bones You Have Thrown Me and Blood I’ve Spilled [Hits The Fan]

Kathryn Joseph was undoubtedly one of 2015’s greatest success stories, with the release of Bones You Have Thrown Me and Blood I Have Spilled propelling her to the forefront of the Scottish scene. Produced with simplicity, honesty and an instantly recognisable vocal, this album served as a perfect introduction to an artist who we are most definitely going to be hearing a lot more from in times to come. (Ellen Renton)

20-11  –  10-1  –  Tracks & EPs

Rustie, Nightwave at Sub Club, 14/4/15

This is a tense one; its gone one at Sub Club and things don’t look to be filling up, but homecoming hero Rustie isn’t on til two so there’s no need to panic just yet.

The show’s move from a Friday gig slot at The Arches to a Tuesday club slot at Sub Club is a drastic one, but also should be one that gives tonight the potential to be legendary – putting one of Glasgow’s shining lights into the world renowned club space.

Rustie’s production style has seemed like a breath of fresh air for dance music in recent years, crossing over genres effortlessly with a maximal touch that has you noticing something new on every listen.

Last year’s Green Language release received a strong reception on the worldwide scale and was generally deemed a step forward for the Pollokshields born DJ and tonight was met with extreme anticipation by the die hards.

Rustie’s other half, Nightwave, gets a steadily growing crowd moving with an eclectic mix of hip-hop and grime enthused pop.

For someone that’s Sub Club ventures over recent years have been limited to Optimo nights, hearing tracks like ‘Ignition (Remix)’ and Nicki Minaj’s ‘Feeling Myself’ in the world famous club space feels odd, but in a good way.

It’s not as odd as the crowd however, who seem to be a mix of eager Rustie fans and young students out on the pull; there is cheap drink on offer, but you would have thought that the tenner entry might put off those just out for a wee winch.

By the end of Nightwave’s set and plenty of big tracks, Skepta’s ‘That’s Not Me’ and The-Dream’s ‘Yamaha’ among the bunch, the dancefloor is filling nicely although the wider club is well short of capacity.

Still, when Rustie does take the booth things start to explode and those here specifically for this moment rush to the front.

Oddly enough it seems his parents are watching, proudly and attentively from the side of the booth, a touching moment in a set that has some blistering highlights.

Dropping in tracks from his own production to other classics in a powerful hour-long set it’s hard to fault Rustie, but you do feel that if this had been a full house he would have pulled out all the stops to make this that bit more special.

People resist throwing water as he slots in two of his tracks with Danny Brown, ‘Break It (Go)’ and ‘Attak’, the latter of which sends the crowd up in euphoria as the set reaches a climactic end.

Tonight further emphasises Rustie’s talents and while it doesn’t quite hit those legendary expectations seeing Rustie in the Sub Club on the Green Language tour is certainly an envied talking point.

 

Words: Iain Dawson

Album of 2014

Andrew Person & Lovers Turn To Monsters – Everything We Miss17 Andrew Pearson & Lovers Turn To Monsters – Everything We Miss [Common]

A combination of two endearing singer-songwriters, brought together under the umbrella of Common Records in the dismal Glaswegian rain, resulting in an equally endearing collection of tracks. Taking a song each throughout the track listing, the single ‘Juan Antonio’ is a standout track in an octet of tracks that will coax out a tear if you let them. (Kyle McCormick)

[review]

Fat-Suit – Jugaad17 Fat-Suit – Jugaad [Equinox]

With a 15 strong collective of highly trained musicians, in the later part of 2014 Fat-Suit released an instrumental album of innumerable sounds and styles all expertly welded together. Tight grooves splashed with influences from traditional Scottish music and a heavy emphasis on jazz and experimenting ensures that Jugaad is a big, unique flag planted firmly in a Scottish music scene which is very lucky to have Fat-Suit in its midst. (Greg Murray)

[review]

National Jazz Trio of Scotland – Standards Volume III17 National Jazz Trio of Scotland – Standards: Volume III [Karoke Kalk]

Bill Wells has made his name by his collaborations and his experimentations, which often take him to pry the envelope of pop music to great result, at first, Standards: Volume III could appear to be a glossy but unwavering pop album, but upon repeated listens this record is a richly endearing effort for fans and casual listeners alike.

[review]

The Amazing Snakeheads – Amphetamine Ballads17 The Amazing Snakeheads – Amphetamine Ballads [Domino]

Amphetamine Ballads does take some warming to, but after a number of listens and a full appreciation of its delightfully refined latter half, this album is undoubtedly one to be treasured if it appeals to your sense of artistry.

[review]

Withered Hand – New Gods15 Withered Hand – New Gods [Fortuna Pop]

New Gods might at first fool you as sounding like inoffensive dentist-waiting-room shmooth-fm folk-pop; clean but still sensibly naturalistic production, tons of hooks, catchy choruses, acoustic guitars and simple song structures; yet lurking in the lyrics there’s an extremity of emotional tension that swings between stark ugly introspection on one hand and manic optimism on the other.

[review]

Andrew Montgomery – Ruled By Dreams15 Andrew Montgomery – Ruled By Dreams

Former Geneva vocalist Andrew Montgomery went solo with Ruled By Dreams, and has successfully created an album that showcases his writing strengths, both musically and lyrically.

[review]

Thin Privilege - Thin Privilege12 Thin Privilege – Thin Privilege [Struggletown]

For me, Thin Privilege is the band of 2014. With their intense live show alienating crowds’ left, right and centre, I had very high hopes for this record and was not disappointed. This noisy, duel bass assault of an album really grasps the energy of what this very short-lived band was. (Iain Gillon)

[review]

Jonnie Common – Trapped In Amber12 Jonnie Common – Trapped In Amber [Song, by Toad]

Bizarre in all the right places, in all the right ways, Trapped In Amber is perhaps best described as “bizarre pop” as a direct consequence. Pleasingly simple soundscapes provide the backdrop to lyrics that span the board from drama to comedy, with hints of balladry (‘Fractal’), hip-hop (‘Crumbs’) and amazement (‘Binary 101’) all contributing to a record of abundant imagination. (Kyle McCormick)

[review]

Young Fathers – Dead12 Young Fathers – Dead [Anticon/Big Dada]

2014 was Young Fathers’ year, taking home award after award with critical acclaim following them at every turn. Dead was the centre piece of it all, an intoxicating multicultural record that took elements of hip-hop, electronica and pop and put Scottish music firmly back on the musical map.

Rustie – Green Language11 Rustie – Green Language [Warp]

Rustie deserves every single bit of credit that comes his way, while fellow Glaswegian label mate Hudson Mohawke jets off with the glamorous names, Rustie has stuck to his guns and make a record that feels like natural progression. Green Language has all of Rustie’s punch and some very special moments, still we can’t help feel his best is yet to come and we can’t wait.

Beerjacket – Darling Darkness10 Beerjacket – Darling Darkness

Darling Darkness makes for a relaxing listen, but there’s more to it. There’s a depth and texture that goes beyond your ordinary singer songwriter. To mark 10 years of Beerjacket, Peter Kelly has released a beautiful, cosy, folk masterpiece. (Alisa Wylie)

The Twilight Sad – Nobody Wants To Be Here and Nobody Wants To Leave8 The Twilight Sad – Nobody Wants To Be Here and Nobody Wants To Leave [FatCat]

One of the years later releases but well worth the wait, aside from their debut it could be their best yet. The production values like always are superb and the songs reek of melancholic angst and pain just what you’d expect from Scotland’s gloomiest export. The album deserves all the praise it gets. (Phil Allen)

[review]

Mogwai – Rave Tapes8 Mogwai – Rave Tapes [Rock Action]

A lush set of songs that breathe a warm melancholia; flourishes of ambient and electro sounds underpinned by one of the great guitar arsenals in all of music. (Brendan Sloan)

[review]

Stanley Odd – A Thing Brand New7 Stanley Odd – A Thing Brand New [A Modern Way]

The Edinburgh sextet’s third album sees them at their creative best, with their usual concoctions of politics, pop culture and poetry shifted into the next razor sharp gear. Tackling issues of parenthood and imperialism, likely catalysed by recent arrivals and national political awakenings, among other things, A Thing Brand New is thought-provoking and head-nodding perfection. (Kyle McCormick)

[review]

Fatherson – I Am An Island6 Fatherson – I Am An Island [A Modern Way]

Incredible, conceptual debut from a band that looks set to take off in a big way in 2015. Sounds absolutely massive. (Alisa Wylie)

[review]

PAWS – Youth Culture Forever4 PAWS – Youth Culture Forever [FatCat]

Youth Culture Forever might be the perfect follow up to Cokefloat! It takes its predecessors themes and then follows up on them, while also covering some new ground; plus the production is a serious step up and it shows. (Phil Allen)

[review]

Deathcats – All Hail Deathcats4 Deathcats– All Hail Deathcats [Fuzzkill]

I never thought Deathcats would get a full LP release, 2014 truly was a brilliant year for Scottish music. From the get go Deathcats display a penchant for crafting some of the most infuriatingly brilliant melodies in recent memory. Aside from this it’s great to see the band really test their limits and put some of their live show into the record with the great linking sections between songs. (Phil Allen)

[review]

Algernon Doll – Omphalic3 Algernon Doll – Omphalic [Struggletown]

Emo/alt-rock is a genre I that I don’t often indulge in anymore but every so often something pops up which shakes me from that angsty slumber and reminds me that it’s still possible to create original and awesome sounding music in that style. Ewan Grant’s Algernon Doll and their album Omphalic is the perfect example of this, and legendary producer Steve Albini will no doubt help them carry their momentum into next year, with their fourth release in as many years. (Greg Murray)

[review]

King Creosote – From Scotland With Love2 King Creosote – From Scotland With Love [Domino]

A stirring celebration of Scottish pride and resolve; a profoundly evocative album, which handles its subject matter with gentle reverence. This record is nothing less than a masterpiece, and its release saw it receive the critical acclaim that it rightly deserves. The album provided an evocative accompaniment to Virginia Heath’s documentary of the same title, although despite its status as a soundtrack, it is a piece of art in its own right (Brendan Sloan/Ellen Renton)

[review]

Honeyblood – Honeyblood1 Honeyblood – Honeyblood [FatCat]

Glaswegian duo Honeyblood’s self-titled debut unleashes a wave of emotionally aggressive lyrics mixed with sweet melodies and harmonies reminiscent 90s grunge and fitting to their name. The band’s stripped back and minimal setup is compelling, allowing vocalist Stina Tweeddale to showcase her enchanting voice. (Jess Lavin)

[review]

Rustie at The Art School, 24/10/14

Rustie‘s Green Language Tour touches down in Glasgow for a homecoming show of epic proportions, with a full live A/V show with production turning up to 11.

Rustie, aka Russell Whyte, has been building quite a name for himself since his first few single releases back in 2007, leading to him penning a deal with the revered Warp Records.

He manages to mix electronic dance music, with hints of dubstep and grime and creates some fresh sounding instrumental hip-hop with his collaborative efforts.

Individuals’ are treated to an audio and visual assault, with fresh, innovative music.

Rustie’s compositions are an exercise in originality, and the crowd gets exactly what they want.

It’s great that most of the stuff early on tonight is off his latest album, because it is his best work to date, minimising the clichéd ‘bedroom computer 8-bit’ sounds that ran their shelf-by-date by the end of the 2000s (Crystal Castles anyone? Nah? Didn’t think so).

He’s still young, so there is a long way to go before good becomes great, but the potential is there and it’s a nice streamlined performance with a more myopic focus, which prevents Rustie sounding all over the place like his earlier material.

In the same sense it is also a nice perk that Rustie cannot be pigeonholed like the aforementioned Crystal Castles (as it’s so easy to tap into a phase and die with it).

Good set with the newer material from Green Language sounding epic in size.

More Photos

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Words: Derek Robertson
Photos: Jayjay Robertson