Tag Archives: Fat Goth

Fat Goth – Enorme! [Hefty Dafty]

Mainstays of the Scottish underground music scene for several years now, Fat Goth are party-happy Dundonions now on their fourth album of grubby, weed-infused rock music.

Their humorous style is reminiscent of Turbonegro or Dead Kennedys – they named their first album Mindless Crap – but there’s some musical chops to their full throttle wig outs too and now plenty of anger too.

‘Guestbook’ sets them off in typically frenetic style with gang vocals and hyperactive riffs before ‘Residency’ throws in twanging funk bass and drum fills.

‘Somewhat Awkward’ briefly sees the group slide into a classic rock groove before things collapse in on themselves once more for the punk riot ‘Queen Bee’.

Lo-fi in its production, Enorme! may be testing for the casual listener but if you buy into biting humour that flickers just on the edge of turning to rage then tracks like ‘Thoroughbred’ and the scathing ‘Not So Great Expectations’ might well be for you.

As with their previous records some of their jam segments get particularly tiring and the ramshackle country-pirate tracks that dotted their previous records have mostly been excised here.

But what stops Fat Goth from ever settling too comfortably is the flicker of anger that accompanies these songs.

Despite the lo-fi sounds – and in a similar vein to the oft-compared Future of the Left – there’s still plenty of seething rage underneath the knockabout titles and daft lines.

Ready to tackle the modern world with both justified anger and bout of piss-taking, Fat Goth are as provocative as ever.

[soundcloud url=”https://api.soundcloud.com/tracks/318269975″ params=”color=ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false” width=”100%” height=”166″ iframe=”true” /]

Words: Max Sefton

Electric Fields, 29/8/15

The journey down to Electric Fields begins post 9am and a ‘Happy Bus’ from Buchanan Bus Station; how anyone can muster up the energy to be “happy” at this time in the morning is beyond me and the atmosphere on the bus is as you’d expect from bed missing music lovers with not to many getting mad for it from the off.

Arriving a good portion of time before the gates are officially opened, even after a lengthy toilet stop, you can’t help but feeling an extra hour in bed could have happened and with the promise of showers and the potential of thunder and lightning forecast it’s going to take that first beer to get things into gear.

Once in the queue things start to spark up, as the guys on the gates seem full of optimism and banter and waste no time jumping up the line to check bags in advance, speeding up entry.

Once we’re in a look at the fact that tokens that need to be purchased separately to exchange for drinks brings back horrific memories of queuing all day; but a cheeky six tokens for £20 offer, the beer being Innes & Gunn by the (cold) can and not the usual warm watered down piss you’d find at any other festival offering a similar policy, a lanyard for a sole quid and that the festival isn’t quite large enough, or it’s prepared well enough, to not have any queues of note leaves these initial quibbles at the gate.

The set up of Electric Fields is intriguing with the two main stages titled Carse Valley, a bizarre blow up effort, and The Arc sitting right next to each other in order maximise the amount of bands that can play, while the smaller To Lose La Trek uses the same music friendly set up of the larger ones in system used at a bigger scale in forward thinking international festivals like Primavera Sound.

FOREIGNFOX

I begin my day down at The Arc for Dunfermline’s brilliant FOREIGNFOX, who deliver a set full of storming indie rock with soaring hooks fronted by Jonny Watt’s distinctive Scottish twang that powers above the bold instrumentals.

Watt could be found later wandering around steaming firing a ravechild tote bag over folk’s head and other things, but more on that later; his band touch on the poppier side of post rock and the indulgent side of indie, but the crowd that have arrived on site early are won over confidently down at a side of the field that could have done with a few less tractors running over it, something I’ll learn more first hand later on (yeah I decked it!).

On the other side of the field is The Skinny Tent, and here we find the stage that boasts the best sound of the day, as the tent seems set up to perfection to host an array of loud, danceable and fun acts from Scotland and afar.

My first venture here is for Glasgow krautrock touting psycsters OUTBLINKER, who look a much more conventional band on a large stage than when they were crammed into The Hug and Pint’s tiny basement a few months ago, and it seems they take to the bigger space with ease despite its light and airy feel and green house-like qualities.

OUTBLINKER do generally need time to grow into a set and with only half an hour to play with they have to speed up this process; they do this to perfection building from swirling noise before a monster riff kicks in and they smash the possibilities wide open.

Technically this band is gobsmacking, and they’re driven by tight and emphatic rhythms from a drummer who delivers with real attention grabbing purpose.

They do enter a heavily distorted mid section that seems to build for a bit too long, but OUTBLINKER are still maybe a bit short on material, give then time and this could be one of the best live experiences you’ll get.

Randolphs Leap

Back over at The Arc we get our twee dose of the day (sorry guys), and the sun is out as Randolph’s Leap produce a set of infectious, brass enthused indie pop joy.

It’s endearing, uplifting stuff full of charming rhymes that really shouldn’t work; it’s the ideal sound to take a seat and relax to, shame the floor’s too wet.

Early afternoon and those promised showers seem an age away, and as singer Adam Ross expresses his regret for wearing a jacket someone for the audience shouts “take it off”, to which he obliges as the brass section provide obligatory strip tease music and the quip of the day comes in the form of “look out ladies he’s down to his woolly jumper”.

Pronto Mama

The big clash of the day comes at 2pm as enchanting indie rockers Catholic Action take to The Skinny Tent at the same time as the pop filled fun of Pronto Mama take to the inflatable Carse Valley stage; I go for the later due to the sunshine and an impatience waiting for The Skinny tent to get set up and I’m not let down as I’m met with a live sound that is just as engrossing as their records.

Pronto Mama’s sound is full of soul and comes with an enabling touch of brass and plenty of cheeky funk that sets a grove while withstanding becoming cheesy.

Pronto Mama impressively walk a slippery path with a sound that could so easily fall into the pitfalls of becoming like so many bland Scottish folk acts or go the other way turn into unabashed naff ska, instead they come out with something truly infectious and original in the early afternoon sun.

Their set is warm and engaging and as Hector Bizerk’s Louie stresses to me “they’re the most underrated band in Scotland,” I’m inclined to agree.

The Van Ts

A late addition to the line up in replacement for the ill KLOE, The Van T’s get the opportunity to thrive in the sunshine and thrive they do; their set is full of pure good times surf enthused garage rock that oozes rock’n’roll energy in a truly infectious manner.

The Thompson twin’s harmonies sparkle in the open air and there’s no denying they look cool as anyone on today’s bill; a more than adequate replacement for KLOE’s soaring pop.

Fat Goth

As The Van T’s finish you can hear the sheer power of Fat Goth from across the field as they take to The Skinny Tent and once I arrive in the tent they capture me instantly with their sneery, distressed and devastatingly loud performance.

It’s impressive stuff from the Dundee trio who produce a frantic display that acts as welcome escape from the sunshine soaked pop vibes outside.

They tear through classic metal sounding riffs with pounding rhythms and an addictive quality that is difficult to match.

Another blinding set from one of the best named bands in Scotland; throw in a bottle of Buckie and some incredible drummer faces and you’ve got one of the most emphatic sets of the day.

United Fruit

Following Fat Goth at The Skinny Tent isn’t an enviable task, but United Fruit are more than equipped to do so and release another ball of fury into the immaculate sounding tent.

United Fruit unleash another powerful set that has become typical of their intense live show; on record Iskandar Stewart’s occasionally touch on whiney, but live they’re strong, sneered chants that drive impressively over a pulverising instrumental assault.

Following them, on the same stage, I get to cover Happy Meals for the second time in just over a week and the duo produce a set that blows away their understated late afternoon appearance at Doune the Rabbit Hole the week before.

Shrouded in smoke they produce an indulgent set of lush organic synths that cruise beautifully into a tent that’s just starting to get its feet moving.

Towards the end of the set Suzi Rodden jumps into the crowd and prances about while partaking in some crazed dancing, all while delivering her endlessly adorable French vocals, while Lewis Cook adds the synths from the stage, creating a tent filling brilliance.

It’s pure indulgent fun from a band that seem to be pulling it all out the bag, except the compulsory toy you get with their namesake of course.

Indeed, the one let down of the festival is you struggle to find anything better than a Happy Meal to eat; the four vans only seem to cater for mediocre fast foods and veggie options which don’t expand much further than toasties, but still this is a festival in its infancy, the good food will come; next year please!

Miaoux Miaoux

Bumping into a few folk I only manage to catch Miaoux Miaoux from afar, still their infectious synth tones and stick in your head vocal hooks seem to spark through the festival site contagiously and start the evening portion of the festival with a dance as the potential for beer weariness rears its ugly head.

The Twilight Sad

Over at The Skinny Tent and it’s the turn of the secret guests, who the festival had revealed to anyone who had guessed from a rather creative image as The Twilight Sad earlier in the week.

In fact it’s just James and Andy producing a stripped back set, which on paper should showcase the raw emotion that comes across in James Graham’s powerful delivery; sadly although captivating in moments, it doesn’t quite hold the same effect without a blasting wall of sound behind it.

Still, for some ultra fans, including FOREIGNFOX’s Jonny Watt who exclaims he would “suck everyone of their dicks”, the set goes down a storm and there’s a humour rarely seen on stage from Graham stating “I wish Erasure were playing, it’d be much better than this miserable shit,” while exchanging chat with the crowd.

Over at Carse Valley Golden Teacher suffer an out of place set in early evening daylight; last week at Doune they set the place alight in the early hours of the morning, but playing a more restrained set at a more restrained hour doesn’t seem to suit them.

Although musically they are solid as ever, with on touch disco tingling beats, plenty of experimental flourishes and quirky dance moves that keep things interesting, it never really lifts beyond that; if this is your first experience of GT live don’t take it by the book, go check them out when they hit their stride best; in a post midnight slot when everyone has their dancing shoes on.

PAWS

Following the festival I had a slight misunderstanding with PAWS regarding a word being taken out of context, still that was quickly ironed out and their set begins over at The Arc with drummer, Josh’s stool breaking and what appears to be some jovial chat about it.

I later learn this to be more dangerous than I’d imaged and in hindsight it seems to take some of the drive out of a band that is usually a formidable live prospect, regardless they deliver the same infectious pop punk glory as ever, but seem to take a while to settle, while the sound being a touch quieter than you’d expect and the rather static audience do them no favours.

PAWS are best enjoyed at full pace and full volume, with that full on urgency that the trio have come to embody and install in their crowds; still, regardless of any grievances the set is still plenty of fun and a great way to spend the remainder of the disappearing daylight.

Hector Bizerk1

Back over at Carse Valley it’s the turn of potentially the most exciting act on the bill; Hector Bizerk start on a somewhat sombre tone, not that that’s a bad thing, still it’s one of those calm before storm things as before long, Louie, hood up and unphased, blasts into an all out lyrical assault.

This is a band at the top of their game, as Louie takes the crowd under his command and the band plough forward with precision and impressive zeal.

There’s another airing of their ‘Song 2’ cover, which Louie adds a touch of freestyle brilliance to before tracks like ‘Rust Cohle’ and ‘Columbus’ blow everything out the water; extraordinary stuff that only seems to be getting better.

Hearing The Xcerts from afar is more than enough, but thankfully Jonnie Common is taking the stage just over at the smaller To Lose La Trek, a stage I have wandered over to a couple of times, but have not had the chance to see a full set at due to distractions elsewhere.

Common is a far fly away from the painful sound at the main stage, and delivers a brilliantly cheeky performance in his own addictive sort of way.

His set is full of dry humour, clever synths and plenty of ‘give a fuck’ attitude and the healthy crowd seem to give his set that extra kick.

Common’s CARBS bandmate Jamie, aka MC ALMOND MILK, joins him for a few songs later on, showcasing some of his solo material in Common produced ‘How2B Cool in 2014’ as well as CARBS standout ‘Stick A Flake In Me (I’m Done)’, and it’s more addictive stuff, in a very geeky Scottish sort of way; this could be the most fun set of the day.

The Phantom Band

Back over at Carse Valley and The Phantom Band produce a barnstorming performance full of shiver inducing builds and Rick Anthony’s deep, velvety delivery; I’ve jokingly labelled these guys The Phantom Bland before now, but on this showing that label can go in the bin, The Phantom Grand it is then!

King Creosote

The beers have kicked and the long day is taking effect by the time headliner King Creosote takes to The Arc stage, but the singer seems to be in joyous spirits delivering a set choked with a warming beauty that emulates most of his back catalogue and more specifically last year’s standalone From Scotland With Love LP.

There’s no doubting he’s the stand out name on a bill crammed with emerging Scottish talent, the line up is nearly all Scottish barring a few exceptions in The Skinny Tent, but maybe seeing him in the sobering daylight might have been a more uplifting experience, but for those with more stamina, or maybe more time in their bed, than myself this should feel like the perfect end to one of Scotland’s most exciting upcoming festivals.

More Photos

[soundcloud url=”https://api.soundcloud.com/tracks/163992623″ params=”color=ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false” width=”100%” height=”166″ iframe=”true” /]

Words: Iain Dawson
Photos: Stewart Fullerton

T in the Park, Saturday, 12/7/14

Day two of the final weekend in Balado is more typical fair, in terms of Scottish weather at least, as the drizzly conditions descend over the well loved fields latest chart sensation Kiesza treats those early risers to a catchy synchronised dance filled rendition of number one single ‘Hideaway’, I wander past on route to T Break to catch the end Glasgow based Perth boys We Came From Wolves.

When I get there, arriving early today still doesn’t quite cut it for getting in on time due to the overwhelming popularity of Saturday day tickets, it doesn’t surprise to find a bigger than usual crowd sheltering from the rain, regardless the band seem to be hitting a chord with their fast paced, clap along, pop tinged jaggy rock sound.

I only get to see around one and a half songs but it’s certainly enough to peak my attention for the next time they’re playing back home; it’s then time to head back over to the media tent to gage the days events after early rush.

In the midst of the confusion I manage to somehow miss bolshy funfair popsters The Moon Kids, but do manage to at least see the second half of The Stranglers, or one half of The Stranglers depending on how you see it, and although the veteran rockers may not be the best choice for the youngsters they go down well with the Balado regulars and ‘No More Heroes’ ticks another big track of the ‘seen live’ list.

Over at Radio One Sophie Ellis-Bextor gives us a few disco tinged pop numbers spaced out by some rather whimsical newer efforts, while making us feel old by stating this is her first T in the Park since 1998, when you take a glance at her back catalogue this is pretty hard to believe since her rise to fame through Spiller number one single ‘Groovejet (If This Ain’t Love)’ was only in 2000.

Still wether Sophie thinks she’s older than she actually is, 35 incidentally and looking good for it, it’s a fun filled set, but her dancing in a pretty much see through negligee, albeit a little more tasteful that Charli XCX yesterday, feels a touch inappropriate.

Still the afore mention Spiller single, a cover of Moloko’s ‘Sing It Back’ and her best known solo effort ‘Murder On The Dance Floor’ boost up the disco vibes and get the good times feeling flowing before as and Sophie herself puts it: “like Mary Poppins I fly away”.

Back over at the Main Stage the dubstep infected pop of Katy B is a graspingly infectious follow up, as the Londoner’s distinct accent washes over gathering crowd, who’re enjoying a rare dry spell.

B is joined by four black and white clad dancers and puts on a very active display, strutting and skipping around the stage while giving us her enjoyable pop tinged spin on many London based dance movements.

Her more urban effected tracks get the biggest reaction this afternoon, as break out 2010 singles ‘Katy On A Mission’ and ‘Lights On’ spark a massive reaction from the ever growing Main Stage audience.

Over at T Break I catch two non ‘T Break’ acts back to back, the first of which is Berkshire raised, pixie cropped teenager Chloe Howl who twitches around the stage in almost hyperactive fashion, while delivering some shimmering electronic pop in her distinct southern English accent.

She’s certainly not off putting for those sheltering from the weather and with a major label behind her it wouldn’t be a surprise if this girl was massive in years in come.

The infectious pop rock of Aussie’s The Jezabels follows at the same stage, and the band who have been making waves on touring with Depeche Mode and the Pixies do themselves no harm today as singer Hayley Mary flows across the stage delivering powerful vocals akin to Stevie Nicks in delivery, while also managing to hit high notes Kate Bush would be proud of.

Chants of “Aussie, Aussie, Aussie” from the crowd are shunned by the band not wanting to stereotyped like their countrymen in the crowd, instead they move through a set of building rockers that would have people of all ages hooked.

Mary gives her fellow Aussie’s a slightly back handed nod by saying “thanks for the flag but put it down now”, before giving a nod to September’s referendum and then finishing on the soaring ‘A Little Piece’.

It’s then time to play count the bucket hats as Manchester Britpop forerunners and T in the Park regulars James deliver the typical fun filled singalong as hits like ‘Sit Down’ and ‘Laid’ ring around the festival well after the set is done.

Over at BBC Introducing, a stage featuring less Scottish acts than it did last year, possibly down to the acts that got a shot at Big Weekend in Glasgow back in May, Dundee’s Copper Lungs play to a mobbed tent and look like they’re in their element.

The four-piece’s pop edged post-hardcore sounds perfectly at home in these surroundings and with room to spare, live all the whiney edges of the records that make them somewhat of a acquired taste are shaved off and the raw energetic performance is a joy to behold, enough to convince anyone that if they continue on the same projectory they’ll get to play bigger stages than this in years to come.

The Amazing Snakeheads close off Introducing tonight and the band that are so often given the Marmite description prove that whether you love them or hate them they’re certainly not dull with performance that riles the crowd into sheer frenzy.

It’s high octane stuff from start to finish as Dale Barclay’s sneery punk delivery and maddened grin are offset perfectly by William Coombe’s bouncing bass and slithering movements, it’s in your face psychedelic rock that moves from rockabilly to punk in the blink of an eye and would scare many watching Rudimental over at the Main Stage.

But as Barclay swigs a bottle of Buckfast and passes to along the front row and mosh pits break loose, these Glasgow boys prove they are anything but boring.

Next up is the most difficult choice of the evening as Pharrell Williams and The Human League’s set run into one another, but as Pharrell has a good 20-minute start on the Sheffield new wavers we start off at the Main Stage and see how it goes.

As you would expect it’s infectious stuff and Pharrell in that now iconic hat struts around the stage knowing just how cool he is opening with Daft Punk’s ‘Lose Yourself To Dance’; it’s amazing to consider Pharrell’s back catalogue and still hard to believe that he’s in his 40s, but as the torrential rain blasts down Pharrell’s funk filled festival friendly set is exactly what is needed.

A quick rendition of Nelly’s ‘Hot In Herre’ from his production back catalogue heats things up before the man of the moment lifts the crowd again, recognising the horrid condition and shouting “you are officially here to party” before introducing a couple of N.E.R.D numbers.

Giving a nod to the crowd’s “relentless Scottish energy” Pharrell introducing his dance crew, The Babes, who break loose as we get a run through or some of Pharrell’s biggest production hits, including Gwen Stefani’s ‘Hollerback Girl’ and Snoop Dogg’s ‘Drop Like It’s Hot’, before performing Robin Thicke’s anthem ‘Blurred Lines’.

As I make my way over towards the King Tut’s Tent Pharrell brings Pinkie on stage, a girl who he announces “beat cancer” and as she receives a tearful hug from Virginia born superstar it’s a moment to step back to take check of what happening before ‘Happy’ launches the crowd to feverous joy once again.

Still as good as Pharrell is, nothing could quite prepare you for the glory of The Human League, who stamp their mark on the festival and leave the Arctic Monkeys with a lot to do if they want the glory of being Yorkshire’s favourite sons in Balado this weekend.

After getting a touch carried away with the hit after hit of Pharrell I arrive a good portion into their set, something instantly regreted as I arrive to the new wave glory of ‘(Keep Feeling) Fascination’, which proves just how good Phil Oakey and co are some 37-years in their career.

The packed tent is electric and the crowd are hanging off every word in a sheer party atmosphere, the huge cheer for “this is a song by my friend Giorgio Moroder” is glorious as Oakey’s track with the Italo disco legend ‘Together In Electric Dreams’ produces an emphatic dance along that is only topped by the the crowd singing every word to iconic hit ‘Don’t You Want Me’ before Oakey had even picked up the mike again.

The singalong continues long after the band have left the stage, but leaves a somewhat odd feeling that the should be headliners have already happened.

Like last night I end my night on a triple bill of T Break, starting with the glitchy electronic of Glasgow trio Atom Tree, and after only forming a year ago their beautiful soundscapes are getting the justification they deserve much sooner than expected.

It’s a somewhat no frills live performance as the band let their haunting pulses do the talking, vocalist Julie Knox is almost stranded behind a table as she takes to synth duties when she could provide the act with a focal point that would add that extra element.

Still, after a hesitant start Knox’s sultry vocals are as captivating as the electronics, at time channeling Beach House’s Victoria Legrand as you lose yourself in a glistening electro daze.

It’s a whole different escape as Dundee’s Fat Goth prepare to take their stage, their press shot appearing on the screens looking much like something Dick Valentine would come away with; yes it’s brash, hilarious and rock ‘n’ roll, everything that the band themselves portray in vast quantities, they must not take themselves too seriously with a moniker such as Fat Goth, right?

They even have their own entrance music, it’s wonderfully theatrical stuff even before the band start blasting their heavy metal riffs and infectiously urgent delivery as their tongue in cheek attitude makes them all the more likeable as people show face that wouldn’t necessarily listen to a band with such a heavy sound.

They don’t quite have the stage banter that you would expect from other bands of their ilk, but hilarity aside there’s distinct quality to these Dundonian’s output that would hook any adamant heavy metal fans as easily as it would someone looking for something a little more jovial than Elbow’s rather dull alt rock seemingly as performed by the cast of Shameless just outside.

Edinburgh’s guitar-laptop/drums duo Birdhead close off T Break on Saturday night with some pulsing bolshie krautrock inspired grooves and sparing but hooky shouted vocals from engaging frontman Stephen Donkin.

These guys manage to pull a bigger crowd than Tuff Love did last night, but it’s still not enough to do them justice as they sound massive for a duo and their uptempo sound in entrancing and much better than anything else on offer at the three big stages.

It is worth noting that as the rain hits us at it’s heaviest Calvin Harris brings Will Smith on stage to introduce him, not something that I manage to see but the Fresh Prince doesn’t perform any of his own hits so we’re putting that down as a let down avoided rather than some missed fun.

Words: Iain Dawson
Photos: Bill Gray

Fat Goth at Tut’s 5/7/14

It’s not easy being from out of town and playing the headline slot in a town like Glasgow, a city known for showing great support to its own lively, young upstarts and street urchins.

It’s no surprise then, that the turn out for local warm up acts; Between Mockingbirds and Ape Man Alien is strong, rambunctious and wholly enthused.

By the time Dundonian trio Fat Goth shamble on stage at 10:30pm much of the fevered crowed had dissipated – no doubt to the downstairs lounge to catch the end of the World Cup match and to buy some pints at the bar, with their mates who had just came off stage.

Taking this in their stride Fat Goth parade on stage, confident and ready to entertain.

Launching into ‘Sin Alter’ a track from recent album One Hundred Percent Suave, demonstrates just how tight this band are at the moment.

Playing an energetic and some what frenetic set, rarely pausing for between track banter, expect for: “our new albums out, you can buy it if you like”.

Despite the jovial and somewhat tongue-in-cheek moniker, Fat Goth are a force to be reckoned with.

The guitars are crunchier than a packet of Quavers, the bass has a scrupulous swagger and the drums are a menacing continuous throb, it’s unbelievable the level of noise these three boys can make.

Next up is – wait for it – ‘You’ll Find Me In Da Club’ (and to be perfectly frank, I’m having a cracking time).

No not a fun upbeat homage to 50 Cent, but in reality a rather dark song tipping the cap to the likes of Eighties Match Box B-Line Disaster and talking about “ruined Birthday cake”, “fellatio in a Chevrolet” and something to do with not being 100% confident in how you look.

The band play the rest of their set with the same fringe flapping enthusiasm and career through what fells like a rather quick (curfew imposed) set.

Other stand out tracks are; ‘Sweet Mister Scary’, ‘Creepy Lounge’ and ‘The Stevie Nicks Method’, while older material like ‘Surf’s Down’ also has many a head bopping along.

The performance is entertaining, loud and in the end you come away with a satisfied ringing in your ears, next time Glasgow hang around and show some more support to your northern cousins, you wont be disappointed.

More Photos

[soundcloud url=”https://api.soundcloud.com/playlists/32681914″ params=”color=ff5500&auto_play=true&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false” width=”100%” height=”450″ iframe=”true” /]

Words/Photos: Angela Canavan

T Break: Find Your T Highlight Here

It’s another year, it’s another summer and here’s hoping it’ll be as nice last year, yes the blistering heat of T last year left a few people a little worse for wear, staggering about looking for the next luke warm lager, but we can have no argument that’d it’s more fun in the sun.

However we also know that it’s nice to wander into a wee tent get some shade, or possibly shelter from the rain, and stumble upon your next favourite band, whether that’s cos the likes of Calvin, Biffy et al don’t quite float your boat or cos you’re actively seeking it T Break always holds some hidden charms for those Saturday afternoon where you don’t quite no what to do.

This year we’ve gone and done a wee bit of ground work for you and given you a guide to all the acts playing T Break this year giving you something to listen to, a wee bio and a quote about being able to play the famous stage, and needless to say there’s some belters on there.

So, if you’re hunting out the next T Break to Main Stage behemoths or just seeking a wee gem to surprise you’re pals with have a look through, you’ll be presently surprised.

Atom Tree

Atom Tree

Glasgow’s Atom Tree transcends genres, blending organic tones with electronic pulses, submerging the listener in beautifully haunting soundscapes.

“T in the Park is one of the biggest festivals in Scotland and to be considered for it let alone playing it at this stage of our careers is a huge privilege.”

[soundcloud url=”https://api.soundcloud.com/tracks/152464536″ params=”color=ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_artwork=true&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false” width=”100%” height=”166″ iframe=”true” /]

BirdheadBirdhead

Intense dentist-drill synths and sharp, cyclical guitar patterns make out with perky motorik drums and probing bass to produce a prog/post-punk metronomic groove rock thing with plenty of intensity.

They are reminiscent of Nought, Public Service Broadcasting or Plank! with some unhinged, sparse, yelpy vocals; Krautrock reborn with balls.

“We are absolutely over the moon to be picked for T-Break.

“T in the Park is a festival I’ve been to more times than I can count, and to be able to be part of it from the other side of the fence is amazing.

“I can’t wait to give a performance as memorable as the ones I’ve seen down the years!”

[soundcloud url=”https://api.soundcloud.com/tracks/150314970″ params=”color=ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_artwork=true&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false” width=”100%” height=”166″ iframe=”true” /]

10309563_254873318033802_5278610803308943612_nBlood Relatives

Blood Relatives who met through Glasgow’s gigging circuit, and bonded over Lidl’s Western Gold Bourbon share no DNA, but they do share an aim of making quality pop music, with a bit of depth to it.

“We are really chuffed to be playing T Break, because it’s a little validation that we’re doing something right, and I’m really self-doubting and easily discouraged.

“It’s lovely to have a vote of confidence, and be part of a line up of quality acts.”

10367141_658568437531805_435630975785025987_nDeathcats

Deathcats is a fuzz pop trio based in Glasgow who formed in the summer of 2012 based on a mutual love of noisy guitar bands and cats.

Since then the band have gigged non-stop all over the UK, from London to Lerwick, and have supported a number of touring acts such as Drenge, Splashh, Hooded Fang and Mazes.

“We’re really stoked to be playing T Break this year; we’ve worked pretty hard over the last year and to be asked to play at Scotland’s biggest festival makes it feel worth it.

“Also, our new album will have just dropped so hopefully we can sell loads to steaming wee bams.”

[soundcloud url=”https://api.soundcloud.com/playlists/28011340″ params=”color=ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_artwork=true&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false” width=”100%” height=”450″ iframe=”true” /]

10372556_785692311455188_2496077165768542007_nFat Goth

Dundee based three-piece Fat Goth have successfully risen from local underdogs to rock fan favourites appealing to those looking for proper meaty, old fashioned rock music.

Recently, they’ve found themselves the subject of Kerrang’s legendary Pandora strip twice, featuring in the magazine and receiving stellar reviews for their humorous and brazen style.

“Playing TITP on the BBC Introducing Stage last year was definitely one of our major 2013 highlights.

“To have the opportunity to play again the following year on the T Break stage is incredible so we’re very much looking to adding some weird to the line-up.”

[soundcloud url=”https://api.soundcloud.com/tracks/146413624″ params=”color=ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_artwork=true&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false” width=”100%” height=”166″ iframe=”true” /]

10013299_1418670885055418_493068720_nMedicine Men

Psychedelic music for the dancefloor, Glasgow’s Medicine Men are already causing quite a stir after just a handful of live shows, drawing excited comparisons with bands such as LCD Soundsystem, Tame Impala, The Chemical Brothers and Death In Vegas, the band mix soaring synths with kinetic breakbeats and bruising basslines, creating a glorious fusion of styles from sublime psychedelic rock to pumping dance music and everything in between.

“To be chosen for T Break is massive for us, we thank the judges for the opportunity and intend to put on the show of our lives.”

10418143_397514107053209_4798724912313766410_nModel Aeroplanes

Fresh and fun pop music, Model Aeroplanes are young and have the world at their feet.

“T Break is a platform for new music which started out many of our favourite bands and after playing T in the Park last year, it is a great honour to have been invited back to perform on the T Break stage this year.

“T in the Park is a great festival with one of the best crowds in the world and it means so much to us that four friends making music can be part of it at such an early stage in our career”

[soundcloud url=”https://api.soundcloud.com/tracks/147189694″ params=”color=ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_artwork=true&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false” width=”100%” height=”166″ iframe=”true” /]

1488284_340955432712407_2080174541_nNAKED

NAKED is like walking through Japan at night; neon-lit, hard punching beats filtered under dissonant guitar sculptures and hypnotising vocals.

The sound explores the novel condition of physicality and sensory experiences – tied to the technological advancement, it’s about the interaction between the accelerating technology and a classical notion of humanity, between synthetic and organic, future and tradition.

It speaks to non-belonging inspired by a fictional Japan, viewed as a signifier of post-millennial, post-digital urban ennui and the pure absolute loneliness of crowds.

“As the late, great Chic Murray might’ve said: This is a red letter day for the group. The letter being T. “

[soundcloud url=”https://api.soundcloud.com/tracks/72675764″ params=”color=ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_artwork=true&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false” width=”100%” height=”166″ iframe=”true” /]

1507066_238271506365899_5317352052050645099_nScary People

Born from the partnership between two tour technicians, Scary People had only one week to form a band and rehearse a set before their first gig at a sold out show in Dundee.

Rising to the task, Dan Forouhar and Scott Anderson called upon friends, Steven Anderson, Jamie Brown and Troy Lynch to join them to prepare for a show that would immediately gain them an impressive crowd response and, since then, a dedicated following.

“Having been a band for just over a year, it’s incredible to be playing this year’s T; it’s encouraging for new acts all over Scotland.”

1932258_589416391154641_401537262_nSecret Motorbikes

“We initially met at the auditions for Britain’s Got Talent in 2010; Tino and Paul were a vocal harmony duo, Gordon was part of a ventriloquism act (he was the dummy) and Iain had a sheep herding act.

“The judges put us together as a group because of our looks, things have been blowing up ever since!

“Different day, same shit.”

10246856_701551333242852_8887027978736676709_nTeenCanteen

TeenCanteen are four-girls split between Glasgow and Edinburgh who, since their formation in 2012, have played some of Scotland’s key festivals as well as supporting The Pastels, Wave Pictures, Evan Dando & Juliana Hatfield and Stealing Sheep.

“We are really excited to have been selected to play this year’s T Break Stage and to be part of a great and diverse line-up.

“T in The Park is a big event for a lot of people who attend – for some it might be the only live music they see all year – and so for a new band it gives us the opportunity to perform in front of an entirely new audience that might not even be aware of us.”

10341644_436891056448565_4137251139114951103_nThe Moon Kids

Fuelled by powerful pop hooks and chiming six-strings, The Moon Kids are shooting for the stars.

Bright lights, big tunes, funfair love affairs and dizzy, dizzy days; a carnival of pulse-quickening anthems and heart-stopping thrills where space is the place and the place is wherever you want it to be.

It’s how The Small Faces might have sounded if they’d starred in A Clockwork Orange; 21st century pop shot through with shades of The Beatles, The La’s and Mark Rothko.

Music made to blast out through the tannoy of the waltzers or maybe the PA in a nightclub owned by Billy Fury and Ringo Starr.

Five-star hooks, king-size choruses and big, big melodies.

“If you’re from Scotland, the festival season is all about T In The Park – it’s the biggest, the brightest and the best.

“We’re thrilled to be added to a line-up that features acts like Arctic Monkeys, Paul Weller and Bombay Bicycle Club.

“In fact, you could say we’re over the moon …”

[soundcloud url=”https://api.soundcloud.com/tracks/105393295″ params=”color=ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_artwork=true&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false” width=”100%” height=”166″ iframe=”true” /]

10171713_789917444366481_6315117863527779249_nTisoki

An electronic producer who makes bass heavy dance music

“It means a lot to be chosen for T Break because it’s a brilliant platform for smaller acts to gain more recognition and a wider fanbase.”

[soundcloud url=”https://api.soundcloud.com/tracks/153866514″ params=”color=ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_artwork=true&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false” width=”100%” height=”166″ iframe=”true” /]

10177499_765731573460290_8377689270503180587_nTuff Love

Tuff Love are Julie, Suse and Michael – two girls and a dude from Glasgow who cut beautifully distorted guitar gems.

Their debut, Junk EP, is the sound of pure summer; dazzling, sun-streaked fuzz pop, with soft, burning melodies, and big smiling harmonies.

They’re like a DIY version of all the best bits of Electrelane crossed with early-MBV and a bit of Breeders swagger – and they’re gonna make your year a whole lot brighter.

“T in The Park was the first festival we went to when we were teenagers, and I never thought I’d play in a band that played at big events like that.

“It’s daunting because the T Break line up is really good this year and we’re in there with some bands who are killer live, but it’s very very exciting for us to have been picked and to be playing! Yahoooo!”

[soundcloud url=”https://api.soundcloud.com/tracks/129606958″ params=”color=ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_artwork=true&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false” width=”100%” height=”166″ iframe=”true” /]

1234366_620761931309792_1410196545_nVladimir

Rising out of the depths of Dundee and describing their sound as simply ‘bleak’, Vladimir burst onto the scene late last year and have quickly won themselves a reputation as one of Scotland’s most exciting new acts.

Emotionally heavy and sonically dense the four piece have become masters at crafting tightly wound layered fuzz and raw Dengler-era Interpol-esque rhythms.

“Its Great to be asked to play a festival we all grew up going to and watching on TV. “When we started this band we were playing to nobody in small pubs now we are going to be playing one of the biggest festivals in the UK.

“It’s not totally sunk in yet.”

[soundcloud url=”https://api.soundcloud.com/tracks/134779005″ params=”color=ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_artwork=true&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false” width=”100%” height=”166″ iframe=”true” /]

1489268_612992008748115_1061074658_nWe Came From Wolves

Jaggy rock/bastard pop from Perth, now based in Glasgow, We Came From Wolves have just returned from a UK tour, dates in France and Germany and sold out release shows supporting their EP Paradise Place.

“As T is in our home county of Perthshire, we have loads of memories of summers spent and bands watched at T.

“It has always felt like our home festival.

“We are so excited and can’t wait for the opportunity to play our music, on home soil for our first major festival appearance”