Tag Archives: Crash Club

Scottish Alternative Music Awards at The Garage, 8/10/15

After three successful showcases the sixth SAMAs main event is finally here with a line up full of past winners and current nominees.
We Came From Wolves open up the night with a mix of new and old songs from their album and previous EP.

As the warm up act for tonight they go down well with plenty of attendees focusing their attention on the soon to be ‘Best Rock Act’.
They give a good show and look genuinely proud to be playing tonight.

Crash Club know how to completely take over a venue and cause an uproar of elation and madness.

Electro and rock, they bring a euphoric and psychedelic twist to tonight’s line up, they bring the rooms vibe to a whole new level with everyone dancing to the never stopping beats and prominent guitars that work so well with each other.

Tonight they don’t have any guest vocalists, it may have added something extra, but generally Crash Club once again are able to perform an ecstatic performance with some of the best lightning of the night.

They happen to win ‘Best Electric Act’ after being nominated two years in a row.

Last years ‘Best Hip Hop’ winners, and oddly not nominated for that or ‘Best Live’ this year, Hector Bizerk have the pleasure of closing proceedings.

What a year they have had thinking back to March 2014 when frontman Louie claimed their award with a memorable rap that people still go on about.

Like Crash Club they are experts at hyping a crowd up; both band and audience aren’t holding back with even a giant Hector flag waving about.

Fan favourite ‘Party in A&E’ is played with some excellent drumming from Audrey Tait.

Marc Rooney of Pronto Mama makes an appearing later on in the set and provides the vocals for new song ‘They Made A Porno On a Mobile Phone and Everybody Laughed’ that goes down brilliantly with an exhilarated crowd.

Another successful year for the SAMAs, some well deserved winners, and some that we maybe don’t agree with, but we’ll chalk that down to personal opinion for the time being.

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Words: Olivia Campbell

Tenement Trail, 3/10/15

Sauchiehall Street on the day of Tenement TV’s annual Tenement Trail is always packed with musicians and gig goers alike, with an unashamed buzz in the atmosphere.

Often regarded as Glasgow’s best music festival, I start a promising day at Broadcast to see the bluesy folk styling’s of Dundonian band Sinderins.

They kick their set off to a packed venue and without any doubt they deliver a superb and transcendent performance with a certain jazz feel to it.

Having seen them play King Tut’s only a few weeks ago, they are on an even better form, with of course David Webster holding a note to an impressive amount of time much to the crowd’s delight.

The guys definitely set me up for the day and with much optimism the next stop is The Art School to see Be Charlotte, another Dundonian who has had quite an impressive year so far.

This is my second time seeing Charlotte; the first was with her laptop, but today she has her band with her, and by the end of her performance I don’t think much can top today.

Her vocals are splendidly executed with her band creating a buoyant and upbeat vibe that Charlotte can jump about the stage to.

With dignified spoken words and a hip hop and pop feel, Be Charlotte can hold a crowd and make it her own; she’s entirely authentic and shows the crowd exactly what music has been missing.

The band has excellent musicianship and we are consistently blown away when both band mates are on percussion.

Like I said Be Charlotte is hands down my favourite of the day, and later we get to hear some damn good vibes yet again when she collaborates with Crash Club.

The Art School’s line up is incredible; it only seems right to stay here for the next couple of acts.

Pronto Mama take to the stage with a dedicated swarm of fans moving right to the front with a completely full room behind them.
Pronto Mama never fails and is considered one of the best live acts in the country with their unique and enthralling sound.

With songs from their EPs, Lickety Split and Niche Market, played they introduce us to a new one, giving the demand for new material from fans and with an album hopefully to be released soon this goes down greatly.

A Big crowd turn up to see Holy Esque, they have established themselves well and were recently Radio 1 play listed and after this performance it’s easy to see why there star is rising.

They blast through tracks from their Submission EP and the crowd favourite ‘Rose’.

Broadcast seems rather quiet as Other Humans begin their set, but with some classy vocals and synth their sound soon draws people from upstairs to witness something entirely new and fresh.

The band as a whole is solid and has fantastic stage presence, the kind where you are completely in tune with them, while the songs are well written and refined; expect big things from these guys!

Acting Strange take to the stage at King Tut’s too Little Richard’s ‘Keep On Knocking’ and kick things of with the lead single ‘RUMBLE’, from their recently released EP Night On The Tiles, followed by the Dylan esc ‘Oh No’.

With just two guitars, vocals and a stomp box it’s easy to see why these two have created such a buzz in a short space of time.

They power through the rest of the set fusing the best of 60’s pop with a rock ‘n’ roll bluesy swagger; the futures bright, or should I say Strange.

I manage to catch the start of Atom Tree and then am just in time for the end of Young Aviators set – both bands have been gaining a lot of attention lately and Young Aviators in particular put on a good show before the last band of the day take the stage.

As Flat 0/1 fills up you can feel something special is about to happen and Crash Club don’t disappoint.

The place erupts as they begin their set, a mix of euphoria and adrenaline; sweat and bodies are flying everywhere, and the atmosphere can only be described as “pure mental”.

They are joined on the stage by Medicine Men’s Ian Mackinnon to perform the anthemic ‘Recondition’; Mackinnon has the crowd in the palm of his hand and again the place just explodes.

Crash Club also show off new tracks featuring Be Charlotte and storm through the rest of the set showing why they are the band to close the festival.

With Scotland in the bag the sky’s limits for Scotland’s (not for much longer) best kept secret.

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Words: Olivia Campbell

T in the Park 2015 (Sunday)

Sunday morning; we’re a couple of bodies light from last night, as a couple of my pals feel the excesses of yesterday a bit much to raise themselves from their bed, regardless those of us with a job to do make the trip up following the daily Greggs cure and the trip up is relatively easy going.

Opting to park near where we parked the first night, meant no issues with muddy hills tonight, but we were anticipating a reasonable amount of traffic tonight as people head home rather than camp another night another, plus there wouldn’t be any excessive head starts are one of the closers tonight is real attention grabber.

I arrive at T Break in time to catch the last part of Be Charlotte’s set; having given them a quick listen prior and having Louie from Hector Bizerk singing their praises at me the previous night, had me intrigued to see what they had to offer live.

Indeed Hector’s Audrey Tait is delivering some powerful rhythms for the innovative Charlotte; all the while sky-teasing synths come in behind a vocal that carries as much gritty attitude as it does technical brilliance.

In the short space of time I see them, she raps and sings with precision and struts the stage with a confident urban swagger and bags of gutsiness; plenty to look out for I reckon.

Wandering over to BBC Introducing and Tongues are already in full flow with powerfully backed tracks full of soaring synths and the occasional captivating harmony.

There’s some nice ideas here from the Glasgow boys, certainly enough to suggest they could be higher up the bill in years to come.

Next up is potentially my clash of the weekend as the chirpy fussy brilliance of The Van T’s at T Break crosses over with the wonderful Bdy_Prts’ set at BBC Introducing for all but five-minutes either side.

So, I start at T Break and it appears the Thompson twins have come a long way since I put them on at Broadcast over a year ago; they have acquired a shit load more presence, yet that fun filled surfy energy still emits from their set.

There’s even corners of their set that angle into full on riot grrrl power as there ‘boyfriends’ dance taps aff down the front; these girls have been coming to T for the last few years and they seem in their element a week or so after their 21st birthday’s.

The Van Ts-7 2

Having to miss the end of the set to catch the end of Bdy_Prts I’m severely hoping I haven’t made the wrong choice, but Jen and Jill never seem to let down.

The crowd is pretty sparse, but the duo is engaging as ever as they syncronise up, clad in the same pink and yellow skintight outfits they sported at The Hug and Pint launch a wee bit ago.

Indeed, each time I see these guys they seem to get more impressive, their set has gone from stripped back quirky harmonics to full on aural assault, all the while the girl’s impressive voices remain rightfully the focal point.

Even their banter is in sync as the duo, who seem clear as day to be best pals just having fun, deliver new single ‘Cold Shoulder’, which floats and weaves with their angelic vocals, backed with that extra push from a rhythm section that enhances their live set considerably; can’t wait to hear more.

Bdy-Prts-10

Next stop is the Tut’s Tent for Admiral Fallow, admittedly I’m not the best guy to be reviewing them as I’ve grown tired of this Scottish singer-songwriter, gone full blown big sounding indie folk band, still Louis Abbott and co. seem as strong as ever and their new material sounds comfortable in the set.

I don’t have to particular like it to say that they are fully entitled to the stature they have achieved in this ‘uplifting indie folk’ bracket, they do it as well as anyone else out there and will rightfully come away with plenty of praise.

After cutting about the press area for longer than anticipated I ample over for the latter stages of Idlewild’s set, and while admittedly they kind of bypassed my musical intake first time around, what I have heard of them has always been of considerable quality.

What the set does lack for me personally, which sadly is pretty essential during a festival like this, is a familiarity; for a band that hold this level of popularity you’d expect to recognise a few numbers, however the set passes by without much of an inkling.

Still, the set is solid and quashes and doubts about Idlewild’s live quality, with Roddy Woomble looking to have not aged a day in the afternoon sunshine of Strathallan.

At T Break Benjamin Booker pulls a fair crowd, and there’s plenty of snarly, guttural energy to them too, it’s deep south rock with plenty of twang and load of drive, that injects a level of power into proceedings before Modest Mouse’s airing over a Tut’s.

These guys have quite a formidable reputation and attract a much larger crowd than anticipated.

Still, despite the large crowd and Isaac Brock and co.’s powered, but disappointingly quiet, performance, this is a festival crowd and one that are hard to tap into unless you play the hits; ‘Float On’ predictably gets the biggest reaction, but this is another example of a band you need to see on a venue tour, on their own terms, rather than at a huge festival.

Cassels are couple of young boys, but their sound seems to pack a fair punch over at BBC Introducing as a cacophony of pummeling drums and crunching guitar form a formidable sound that could easily blast them into the public eye before long.

Indeed youth is their benefit, but admitting you’re in a “shitty mood” when on stage at T in the Park probably isn’t the best way to warm yourself to an audience mainly full of people chancing upon you.

Stumbling into T Break for a bit of Crash Club’s blasting electronics, which sounds massive and draws a big crowd, but still somehow feels like 90s lads throw back and being relatively underwhelmed by the over the top quirkiness of Spring Break it was time for The Prodigy.

By this time the weekend is taking affect, and the sleep deprivation isn’t helping the alcohol tolerance, but this is the kind of situation that is specifically designed for T in the Park.

We don’t manage to really get close enough to enjoy the full effects of the legendary dance aficionados, but still it’s powerful stuff that erupts with hits that you’d forgotten about, alongside ones you were waiting for; no wonder big Geoff Ellis made them the centre-piece of his speech at the line up launch all those months ago.

We have to dash 10-minutes from the end, some of us have work in the morning, but that’s not enough to miss the rush and we end up caught in traffic for what seems like forever; still it’s another enjoyable year.

Granted I didn’t see the campsite, but a few slight alterations in traffic organisation, parking and layout and things should be going swimmingly next year.

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Words: Iain Dawson
Photos: Bill Gray

Crash Club – ‘Last Dance’ ft. Tony Costello

Crash Club’s rise to recognition, following the selection of ‘Recondition’ as T in The Park’s edit soundtrack for 2015, left fans with high expectations since its release in November.

Their new track ‘Last Dance’ manages to meet the standard we have come to expect of them, without raising the bar.

I’ll begin with the good stuff: to say that ‘Last Dance’ is exemplary of the electro-rock genre is to state the obvious, it’s moving, powerful, weighty; it would make a fantastic tune to run to.

Tony Costello’s voice makes for an interesting break from the norm and the feminine touch introduced by Bernadette Donnelly’s vocals balances the hardcore, testosteroney masculinity of the track really well.

It can be said without doubt too that it has been mixed and mastered with a great deal of talent and attention by Thomas MacNeish at Rubber Gum Studios.

As a beat track, then, it does its job to great success; that’ what I liked about it.

What I had hoped for was something with more of the grit shown and promised by ‘Recondition’.

While ‘Last Dance’ is solid and well presented, there is little about that distinguished it as definitively Crash Club – unlike the new T in the Park soundtrack which is racy and original – the tune simply doesn’t hold true to their grungy, compelling prior work as much as hoped.

This criticism should by no means deter the would-be listener.

I resolutely feel that a band going from strength to strength, as Crash Club are, with nominations and increasing media attention, deserves an honest review.

I look forward to what they produce next.

Words: Patrick McCafferty

Crash Club – ‘Recondition’

Crash Club’s latest single ‘Recondition’ is a welcome addition to the electro-rock scene in Scotland as it pulses with upbeat grooves, catchy vocals and a sound that lies somewhere between 80’s pop and modern dance.

The song begins almost like a siren of intense synth sounds and eventually stabilises, with a strong thumping beat and a captivating melody, which mixes this electronic beginning with distorted guitar.

The assertive upbeat feeling the song produces is easy to instantly acknowledge, as a dance-worthy record and the confident, emphatic voice of guest vocalist Ian McKinnon, from Medicine Men, gives it more of a rock ‘n’ roll dynamic.

Towards the end of the record there is a mini breakdown, which shows off McKinnon’s vocal talents and builds back up into an electro-rock upsurge, eventually dying down to one last dance groove and vocal harmony.

This is Crash Club’s second single and is proving to be a success within the electro-rock/pop genre, as when the dance grooves of ‘Recondition’ play, it is hard to keep your feet grounded.

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Words: Louis Jenkins