Tag Archives: Birdhead

Electric Fields, Day 2, 2/9/17

Arriving on site again to find the sun out again is a glorious sight and we’re just on time for the Vitamin C hit that is Sacred Paws; the duo are so infectious and likeable, their chirpy harmonies and Rachel Aggs’ signature tropical guitar style just feels like it’s good for you.

Whimsically dancey, like a low-key afternoon party under the bright sunshine they are uncomplicated and carefree in their delivery of both sound and performance; you might find yourself somewhere between a calypso paradise and a trippy dream. Featuring witty syncopation, the question and answer pattern to a number of their vocal segments creates a real classy show.

They are the perfect band for this time and weather, the latter obviously there’s been a bit of luck for but the fact there’s a healthy crowd down early for them can only be a positive getting people moving in the early day while others chill on the grass letting the warmth wash over them.

Saturday sees the Redeemer stage rebranded the Big Pink, and as we wander in Birdhead are filling the tent with punch packing sound that attracts a fairly solid turn out.

Pulsing guitar and electronics are punctuated by powerful drumming as the duo deliver a sound that sounds as big as many five-pieces would, it’s apocalyptic at times but always has a pulsating drive behind it the keeps your feet and head going, the rare snarled vocals keep up the same intensity level, while latest single ‘Custom Muscle’ has the band hilariously pointing out, after noticing kids in the audience, is about “treating your body like an amusement park”.

Whyte Horses Experience seem like another band well suited to a main stage afternoon set, sky soaring pop vocals on slightly psychedelic backdrop hit nicely despite the sun having disappeared, their multi-coloured poncho wearing waving mimes at the front of the stage make an odd focal point but still it’s pretty fun stuff.

Back at the Big Pink I get my first Vic Galloway introduction that becomes a regular feature of the day, after that Edwin Organ delivers gloriously wonky chilled out electronic tracks, with a vocal the soothes and settles with a real beautiful edge, his soft yet elegant tones contrasting that of the broad Glaswegian “cheers” he utters after the opening track.

His voice is full of soul and musically there’s a real original feel to it, for the short burst we get (we’re hitting heavy crossover time now) there’s none that go out to full dance floor fillers but there’s no doubt they’re capable of it.

Clashes aside Aldous Harding seems to take an age to emerge, when she finally starts the set she apologises and states she can’t explain but she is playing a guitar that’s not hers.

Still you’d be hard pushed to complain such is the delicate beauty of her voice, which just hangs in a dreamlike state over the crowd as her gentle picked guitar and subtle electronic touches create a backdrop that compliments the mesmerising nature of what she is capable of.

After the first track there’s another change of guitar and more issues, she apologises and you really feel for her but it seems luck isn’t on her side, yet it’s testament to her quality that the crowd stays with her rather than source some other entertainment.

When she does play there’s a nuanced charm that’s hard to match, a warm yet sad beauty that eases you into another world, yet when you look at her subtle performance there’s a real intensity to her face that suggests she’s in another place too.

The sun is back out for This Is The Kit on the main stage, and Kate Stables’ mellow alt rock possesses a slowly bouncing rhythm that’s lovely to lie back on the grass to.

Touches of brass add a nice element as the band benefit hugely from the sunshine, at points the brass and rhythm take centre stage as jazzy overtones come in before the band settle back down and the soft vocals come back in.

After Aldous Harding ran over a quick changeover at the Discover stage goes successfully and thankfully Shogun is playing his first gig since his jail time, following getting arrested before he was scheduled to support Nas a few months ago.

He’s not lost anything though, as he spits with a venom that has made him one of the most hyped MCs in the UK right now.

Kami-O’s beats have a subtly that sets a trippy bounce and Shogun delivers lyrics that deal with heavy subjects brilliantly and at such breakneck pace that you can’t help but be impressed; look out for him he may be a bit make or bust, but he’s certainly most likely the first Scottish MC to break the mainstream.

Spotting a child at the back he apologises for swearing and yells “alright wee man, you’re the youngest guy to ever see me play, tell your pals you’ll be popular” to much hilarity, by 15-minutes in he states he’s gonna get sweaty and the set takes a huge upturn in pace getting the crowd and even the security guard bouncing along.

Back at the Big Pink Future Get Down enter the stage in full beekeeper suits and immediately set the pace high with a powerful cowbell enthused, whirring yet funky dance vibe, with a chanted vocal that falls somewhere between Mark E. Smith and James Murphy.

There’s such an array of sounds on offer it’s easy to get overwhelmed by the five-piece, but it’s just as easy to get yourself hooked on a groove and go with it; these guys are loads of fun, we’re paying full attention for what’s next.

Over at the main stage bouncing ska is always the order of the day with The Beat featuring Dave Wakeling.

Revolutionary baselines are played in 2/2 rhythms shining against the pulsing reggae tempo; true to their serendipitous sound, they lay their performance bare out into the open air.

Carla J. Easton (TeenCanteen, Ette) closes the Neu Reekie tent and delivers a set that is less poetry, more a keys led singer-songwriter set, but she delivers a delightful stripped back set of sugar coated pop songs in her own unique vocal twang.

It’s tippy toey twinkling stuff and has a real timeless quality as Easton brings the same irresistible pop presence she does with her bands, and while a lot of the subject matter may be a bit cutesy for some, that’s exactly how they’re supposed to be.

All of Easton’s projects seem on a real upward trajectory right now and it seems the future is bright for, whether than be herself or with a band remains to be seen but expect something big soon.

Over at Big Pink Wuh Oh delivers synth and laptop created soundscapes of glitching beauty and tumbling terror in equal measure, all the while dancing like some demented puppet.

His engrossing dancing acts as a focal point that similar acts lack in a live setting and while it’s the music that’s getting him the hype it’s these eccentricities that will see him advance further as a live act.

Directly after Stillhound start off on some jazzy flourishes, before a twinkling synth lead takes over and soft lovelorn vocals create a dreamy gloss to begin a set that gradually increases in tempo as urges you unconsciously into a gentle groove.

Later on they’re joined by vocalist EMILIE, who brings a smooth soulful voice to the band’s glimmering bleepy soundscapes, but we have to dash as we’re dragged into another clash.

That clash turns out to be the unmissable PINS who’re all garage rock attitude, a sneery chanted set full of powerful tracks that incorporate psych and surf vibes into an addictive pop package.

Every member of the band carry off this effortlessly cool vibe and yet it’s still difficult to take your eyes off vocalist Faith Vern who bops about maintaining a presence that cuts as much addictive cool as it does sheer punk attitude.

Smoothly surreptitious, Glass Animals set the scene for an atmospheric performance; it’s soft yet bold, the tunes are smooth, but still impressively sharp in creating crowd-pleasing sounds that resonate long into the night.

It’s all odd ball indie pop, upbeat and plenty of fun as singer Dave Bayley gyrates about the stage in hyperactive fashion, all while a giant golden pineapple spins at the back of the stage; easily accessible stuff that is already well on its way to being a household name.

Sam Gellaitry headlines the Big Pink tent, and manipulates samples to perfection to curate a sound that’s as lush as it is huge.

The Stirling youngster is getting hype the world over and on this evidence it’s easy to see way; the way he commands his kit seems masterful and considering he’s only 20 it’s hard to see him not mastering his craft to much higher levels.

It’s been a long time since I’ve seen Real Estate, some six of so years I considered them one of the best indie bands on the planet, and from today’s evidence nothing appears to have changed.

Their set is warm and welcoming with dreamy nonchalant vocals from Mark Courtney, but their sound is also one of the fullest you’ll hear all weekend; Real Estate are a spot of sunshine once the sun’s gone down, they’re a touch of warmth after it got freezing outside, they’re a band that can’t fail to put a smile on your face.

The Jesus and Mary Chain has got the lackadaisical vibe down to a fine art; they make it look so easy to sound so on point.

Wavering eight beat notes stack up on top of clashy one-stroke chord progressions, leaving you finding it hard to resist the urge to sway along.

The tracks are pretty yet somehow captivatingly dishevelled, and while they lack the riotous atmosphere their reputation from their legendary 80s shows were said to possess, they have matured into a stong live act.

Back at the Discover stage Foxygen up the ante with a pompous set of sheer fun, with a frontman in Sam France that chants like a preacher and fits the part to a tee.

There’s a ten strong band on stage and they utilise every ounce of it to create a huge sound that’s dramatic, charismatic, at points full on cabaret and always just pure entertainment.

In terms of breaking a genre, Dizzee Rascal is as big as they come and 14 years on from the seminal album that thrust grime into the mainstream, Boy In Da Corner, he’s more than got it.

On stage he’s a hugely commanding presence and even tracks from his sixth album, Raskit, released earlier this year, pack a real punch although aren’t quite creating the waves the likes of Stromzy and Skepta are doing.

The new album gets a solid airing but it’s tracks from his early records like ‘Fix Up, Look Sharp’ and ‘Jus’ A Rascal’ that get the set rolling, as the set grows on his proper mainstream material like Calvin Harris numbers ‘Dance Wiv Me’ and ‘Holiday’ get an airing to a huge reception, but not quite as big as closing number ‘Bonkers’, which sets the packed crowd to fever levels.

We’d much rather he stuck with the proper grime material, but ultimately it’s these numbers that many have come to see, you may have witnessed me holding my face is disillusion as the T in the Park favourite “here we fucking go” rings round the audience, but what we have to remember it’s these people that ultimately allow festivals like this to happen.

Still, there’s no such nonsense at the Discover stage as Arab Strap close the festival properly, indeed Aidan Moffat appears to take great pride in being the last band to actually play a song.

It’s just plain old Scottish misery, but it perfectly encapsulates the national with Moffat reciting poetic street stories in his dreary tone, while the band led by Malcolm Middleton’s guitar soar ever higher.

Arab Strap may not be the most buoyant end to a festival but it feels huge, and when they drop the chorus for ‘The First Big Weekend’, after some improvised build up from Moffat, it’s like nothing could be huger, it’s a track that embodies the Scottish temperament perfectly and would be a perfect end to the festival were it not for the band being given an impromptu encore; nobody’s complaining though.

It’s hard to imagine how Electric Fields could have done this any better; the set up, the programming, the food, there being barely any toilet queues, the atmosphere are all superb, but most important of all this is a festival that delivers wall to wall quality music, creating a perfect balance between mainstream appeal and up and coming talent.

More Photos

Words: Iain Dawson/Rachel Cunningham
Photos: Allan Lewis/Erin McKay

T in the Park, Saturday, 12/7/14

Day two of the final weekend in Balado is more typical fair, in terms of Scottish weather at least, as the drizzly conditions descend over the well loved fields latest chart sensation Kiesza treats those early risers to a catchy synchronised dance filled rendition of number one single ‘Hideaway’, I wander past on route to T Break to catch the end Glasgow based Perth boys We Came From Wolves.

When I get there, arriving early today still doesn’t quite cut it for getting in on time due to the overwhelming popularity of Saturday day tickets, it doesn’t surprise to find a bigger than usual crowd sheltering from the rain, regardless the band seem to be hitting a chord with their fast paced, clap along, pop tinged jaggy rock sound.

I only get to see around one and a half songs but it’s certainly enough to peak my attention for the next time they’re playing back home; it’s then time to head back over to the media tent to gage the days events after early rush.

In the midst of the confusion I manage to somehow miss bolshy funfair popsters The Moon Kids, but do manage to at least see the second half of The Stranglers, or one half of The Stranglers depending on how you see it, and although the veteran rockers may not be the best choice for the youngsters they go down well with the Balado regulars and ‘No More Heroes’ ticks another big track of the ‘seen live’ list.

Over at Radio One Sophie Ellis-Bextor gives us a few disco tinged pop numbers spaced out by some rather whimsical newer efforts, while making us feel old by stating this is her first T in the Park since 1998, when you take a glance at her back catalogue this is pretty hard to believe since her rise to fame through Spiller number one single ‘Groovejet (If This Ain’t Love)’ was only in 2000.

Still wether Sophie thinks she’s older than she actually is, 35 incidentally and looking good for it, it’s a fun filled set, but her dancing in a pretty much see through negligee, albeit a little more tasteful that Charli XCX yesterday, feels a touch inappropriate.

Still the afore mention Spiller single, a cover of Moloko’s ‘Sing It Back’ and her best known solo effort ‘Murder On The Dance Floor’ boost up the disco vibes and get the good times feeling flowing before as and Sophie herself puts it: “like Mary Poppins I fly away”.

Back over at the Main Stage the dubstep infected pop of Katy B is a graspingly infectious follow up, as the Londoner’s distinct accent washes over gathering crowd, who’re enjoying a rare dry spell.

B is joined by four black and white clad dancers and puts on a very active display, strutting and skipping around the stage while giving us her enjoyable pop tinged spin on many London based dance movements.

Her more urban effected tracks get the biggest reaction this afternoon, as break out 2010 singles ‘Katy On A Mission’ and ‘Lights On’ spark a massive reaction from the ever growing Main Stage audience.

Over at T Break I catch two non ‘T Break’ acts back to back, the first of which is Berkshire raised, pixie cropped teenager Chloe Howl who twitches around the stage in almost hyperactive fashion, while delivering some shimmering electronic pop in her distinct southern English accent.

She’s certainly not off putting for those sheltering from the weather and with a major label behind her it wouldn’t be a surprise if this girl was massive in years in come.

The infectious pop rock of Aussie’s The Jezabels follows at the same stage, and the band who have been making waves on touring with Depeche Mode and the Pixies do themselves no harm today as singer Hayley Mary flows across the stage delivering powerful vocals akin to Stevie Nicks in delivery, while also managing to hit high notes Kate Bush would be proud of.

Chants of “Aussie, Aussie, Aussie” from the crowd are shunned by the band not wanting to stereotyped like their countrymen in the crowd, instead they move through a set of building rockers that would have people of all ages hooked.

Mary gives her fellow Aussie’s a slightly back handed nod by saying “thanks for the flag but put it down now”, before giving a nod to September’s referendum and then finishing on the soaring ‘A Little Piece’.

It’s then time to play count the bucket hats as Manchester Britpop forerunners and T in the Park regulars James deliver the typical fun filled singalong as hits like ‘Sit Down’ and ‘Laid’ ring around the festival well after the set is done.

Over at BBC Introducing, a stage featuring less Scottish acts than it did last year, possibly down to the acts that got a shot at Big Weekend in Glasgow back in May, Dundee’s Copper Lungs play to a mobbed tent and look like they’re in their element.

The four-piece’s pop edged post-hardcore sounds perfectly at home in these surroundings and with room to spare, live all the whiney edges of the records that make them somewhat of a acquired taste are shaved off and the raw energetic performance is a joy to behold, enough to convince anyone that if they continue on the same projectory they’ll get to play bigger stages than this in years to come.

The Amazing Snakeheads close off Introducing tonight and the band that are so often given the Marmite description prove that whether you love them or hate them they’re certainly not dull with performance that riles the crowd into sheer frenzy.

It’s high octane stuff from start to finish as Dale Barclay’s sneery punk delivery and maddened grin are offset perfectly by William Coombe’s bouncing bass and slithering movements, it’s in your face psychedelic rock that moves from rockabilly to punk in the blink of an eye and would scare many watching Rudimental over at the Main Stage.

But as Barclay swigs a bottle of Buckfast and passes to along the front row and mosh pits break loose, these Glasgow boys prove they are anything but boring.

Next up is the most difficult choice of the evening as Pharrell Williams and The Human League’s set run into one another, but as Pharrell has a good 20-minute start on the Sheffield new wavers we start off at the Main Stage and see how it goes.

As you would expect it’s infectious stuff and Pharrell in that now iconic hat struts around the stage knowing just how cool he is opening with Daft Punk’s ‘Lose Yourself To Dance’; it’s amazing to consider Pharrell’s back catalogue and still hard to believe that he’s in his 40s, but as the torrential rain blasts down Pharrell’s funk filled festival friendly set is exactly what is needed.

A quick rendition of Nelly’s ‘Hot In Herre’ from his production back catalogue heats things up before the man of the moment lifts the crowd again, recognising the horrid condition and shouting “you are officially here to party” before introducing a couple of N.E.R.D numbers.

Giving a nod to the crowd’s “relentless Scottish energy” Pharrell introducing his dance crew, The Babes, who break loose as we get a run through or some of Pharrell’s biggest production hits, including Gwen Stefani’s ‘Hollerback Girl’ and Snoop Dogg’s ‘Drop Like It’s Hot’, before performing Robin Thicke’s anthem ‘Blurred Lines’.

As I make my way over towards the King Tut’s Tent Pharrell brings Pinkie on stage, a girl who he announces “beat cancer” and as she receives a tearful hug from Virginia born superstar it’s a moment to step back to take check of what happening before ‘Happy’ launches the crowd to feverous joy once again.

Still as good as Pharrell is, nothing could quite prepare you for the glory of The Human League, who stamp their mark on the festival and leave the Arctic Monkeys with a lot to do if they want the glory of being Yorkshire’s favourite sons in Balado this weekend.

After getting a touch carried away with the hit after hit of Pharrell I arrive a good portion into their set, something instantly regreted as I arrive to the new wave glory of ‘(Keep Feeling) Fascination’, which proves just how good Phil Oakey and co are some 37-years in their career.

The packed tent is electric and the crowd are hanging off every word in a sheer party atmosphere, the huge cheer for “this is a song by my friend Giorgio Moroder” is glorious as Oakey’s track with the Italo disco legend ‘Together In Electric Dreams’ produces an emphatic dance along that is only topped by the the crowd singing every word to iconic hit ‘Don’t You Want Me’ before Oakey had even picked up the mike again.

The singalong continues long after the band have left the stage, but leaves a somewhat odd feeling that the should be headliners have already happened.

Like last night I end my night on a triple bill of T Break, starting with the glitchy electronic of Glasgow trio Atom Tree, and after only forming a year ago their beautiful soundscapes are getting the justification they deserve much sooner than expected.

It’s a somewhat no frills live performance as the band let their haunting pulses do the talking, vocalist Julie Knox is almost stranded behind a table as she takes to synth duties when she could provide the act with a focal point that would add that extra element.

Still, after a hesitant start Knox’s sultry vocals are as captivating as the electronics, at time channeling Beach House’s Victoria Legrand as you lose yourself in a glistening electro daze.

It’s a whole different escape as Dundee’s Fat Goth prepare to take their stage, their press shot appearing on the screens looking much like something Dick Valentine would come away with; yes it’s brash, hilarious and rock ‘n’ roll, everything that the band themselves portray in vast quantities, they must not take themselves too seriously with a moniker such as Fat Goth, right?

They even have their own entrance music, it’s wonderfully theatrical stuff even before the band start blasting their heavy metal riffs and infectiously urgent delivery as their tongue in cheek attitude makes them all the more likeable as people show face that wouldn’t necessarily listen to a band with such a heavy sound.

They don’t quite have the stage banter that you would expect from other bands of their ilk, but hilarity aside there’s distinct quality to these Dundonian’s output that would hook any adamant heavy metal fans as easily as it would someone looking for something a little more jovial than Elbow’s rather dull alt rock seemingly as performed by the cast of Shameless just outside.

Edinburgh’s guitar-laptop/drums duo Birdhead close off T Break on Saturday night with some pulsing bolshie krautrock inspired grooves and sparing but hooky shouted vocals from engaging frontman Stephen Donkin.

These guys manage to pull a bigger crowd than Tuff Love did last night, but it’s still not enough to do them justice as they sound massive for a duo and their uptempo sound in entrancing and much better than anything else on offer at the three big stages.

It is worth noting that as the rain hits us at it’s heaviest Calvin Harris brings Will Smith on stage to introduce him, not something that I manage to see but the Fresh Prince doesn’t perform any of his own hits so we’re putting that down as a let down avoided rather than some missed fun.

Words: Iain Dawson
Photos: Bill Gray

T Break: Find Your T Highlight Here

It’s another year, it’s another summer and here’s hoping it’ll be as nice last year, yes the blistering heat of T last year left a few people a little worse for wear, staggering about looking for the next luke warm lager, but we can have no argument that’d it’s more fun in the sun.

However we also know that it’s nice to wander into a wee tent get some shade, or possibly shelter from the rain, and stumble upon your next favourite band, whether that’s cos the likes of Calvin, Biffy et al don’t quite float your boat or cos you’re actively seeking it T Break always holds some hidden charms for those Saturday afternoon where you don’t quite no what to do.

This year we’ve gone and done a wee bit of ground work for you and given you a guide to all the acts playing T Break this year giving you something to listen to, a wee bio and a quote about being able to play the famous stage, and needless to say there’s some belters on there.

So, if you’re hunting out the next T Break to Main Stage behemoths or just seeking a wee gem to surprise you’re pals with have a look through, you’ll be presently surprised.

Atom Tree

Atom Tree

Glasgow’s Atom Tree transcends genres, blending organic tones with electronic pulses, submerging the listener in beautifully haunting soundscapes.

“T in the Park is one of the biggest festivals in Scotland and to be considered for it let alone playing it at this stage of our careers is a huge privilege.”

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BirdheadBirdhead

Intense dentist-drill synths and sharp, cyclical guitar patterns make out with perky motorik drums and probing bass to produce a prog/post-punk metronomic groove rock thing with plenty of intensity.

They are reminiscent of Nought, Public Service Broadcasting or Plank! with some unhinged, sparse, yelpy vocals; Krautrock reborn with balls.

“We are absolutely over the moon to be picked for T-Break.

“T in the Park is a festival I’ve been to more times than I can count, and to be able to be part of it from the other side of the fence is amazing.

“I can’t wait to give a performance as memorable as the ones I’ve seen down the years!”

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10309563_254873318033802_5278610803308943612_nBlood Relatives

Blood Relatives who met through Glasgow’s gigging circuit, and bonded over Lidl’s Western Gold Bourbon share no DNA, but they do share an aim of making quality pop music, with a bit of depth to it.

“We are really chuffed to be playing T Break, because it’s a little validation that we’re doing something right, and I’m really self-doubting and easily discouraged.

“It’s lovely to have a vote of confidence, and be part of a line up of quality acts.”

10367141_658568437531805_435630975785025987_nDeathcats

Deathcats is a fuzz pop trio based in Glasgow who formed in the summer of 2012 based on a mutual love of noisy guitar bands and cats.

Since then the band have gigged non-stop all over the UK, from London to Lerwick, and have supported a number of touring acts such as Drenge, Splashh, Hooded Fang and Mazes.

“We’re really stoked to be playing T Break this year; we’ve worked pretty hard over the last year and to be asked to play at Scotland’s biggest festival makes it feel worth it.

“Also, our new album will have just dropped so hopefully we can sell loads to steaming wee bams.”

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10372556_785692311455188_2496077165768542007_nFat Goth

Dundee based three-piece Fat Goth have successfully risen from local underdogs to rock fan favourites appealing to those looking for proper meaty, old fashioned rock music.

Recently, they’ve found themselves the subject of Kerrang’s legendary Pandora strip twice, featuring in the magazine and receiving stellar reviews for their humorous and brazen style.

“Playing TITP on the BBC Introducing Stage last year was definitely one of our major 2013 highlights.

“To have the opportunity to play again the following year on the T Break stage is incredible so we’re very much looking to adding some weird to the line-up.”

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10013299_1418670885055418_493068720_nMedicine Men

Psychedelic music for the dancefloor, Glasgow’s Medicine Men are already causing quite a stir after just a handful of live shows, drawing excited comparisons with bands such as LCD Soundsystem, Tame Impala, The Chemical Brothers and Death In Vegas, the band mix soaring synths with kinetic breakbeats and bruising basslines, creating a glorious fusion of styles from sublime psychedelic rock to pumping dance music and everything in between.

“To be chosen for T Break is massive for us, we thank the judges for the opportunity and intend to put on the show of our lives.”

10418143_397514107053209_4798724912313766410_nModel Aeroplanes

Fresh and fun pop music, Model Aeroplanes are young and have the world at their feet.

“T Break is a platform for new music which started out many of our favourite bands and after playing T in the Park last year, it is a great honour to have been invited back to perform on the T Break stage this year.

“T in the Park is a great festival with one of the best crowds in the world and it means so much to us that four friends making music can be part of it at such an early stage in our career”

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1488284_340955432712407_2080174541_nNAKED

NAKED is like walking through Japan at night; neon-lit, hard punching beats filtered under dissonant guitar sculptures and hypnotising vocals.

The sound explores the novel condition of physicality and sensory experiences – tied to the technological advancement, it’s about the interaction between the accelerating technology and a classical notion of humanity, between synthetic and organic, future and tradition.

It speaks to non-belonging inspired by a fictional Japan, viewed as a signifier of post-millennial, post-digital urban ennui and the pure absolute loneliness of crowds.

“As the late, great Chic Murray might’ve said: This is a red letter day for the group. The letter being T. “

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1507066_238271506365899_5317352052050645099_nScary People

Born from the partnership between two tour technicians, Scary People had only one week to form a band and rehearse a set before their first gig at a sold out show in Dundee.

Rising to the task, Dan Forouhar and Scott Anderson called upon friends, Steven Anderson, Jamie Brown and Troy Lynch to join them to prepare for a show that would immediately gain them an impressive crowd response and, since then, a dedicated following.

“Having been a band for just over a year, it’s incredible to be playing this year’s T; it’s encouraging for new acts all over Scotland.”

1932258_589416391154641_401537262_nSecret Motorbikes

“We initially met at the auditions for Britain’s Got Talent in 2010; Tino and Paul were a vocal harmony duo, Gordon was part of a ventriloquism act (he was the dummy) and Iain had a sheep herding act.

“The judges put us together as a group because of our looks, things have been blowing up ever since!

“Different day, same shit.”

10246856_701551333242852_8887027978736676709_nTeenCanteen

TeenCanteen are four-girls split between Glasgow and Edinburgh who, since their formation in 2012, have played some of Scotland’s key festivals as well as supporting The Pastels, Wave Pictures, Evan Dando & Juliana Hatfield and Stealing Sheep.

“We are really excited to have been selected to play this year’s T Break Stage and to be part of a great and diverse line-up.

“T in The Park is a big event for a lot of people who attend – for some it might be the only live music they see all year – and so for a new band it gives us the opportunity to perform in front of an entirely new audience that might not even be aware of us.”

10341644_436891056448565_4137251139114951103_nThe Moon Kids

Fuelled by powerful pop hooks and chiming six-strings, The Moon Kids are shooting for the stars.

Bright lights, big tunes, funfair love affairs and dizzy, dizzy days; a carnival of pulse-quickening anthems and heart-stopping thrills where space is the place and the place is wherever you want it to be.

It’s how The Small Faces might have sounded if they’d starred in A Clockwork Orange; 21st century pop shot through with shades of The Beatles, The La’s and Mark Rothko.

Music made to blast out through the tannoy of the waltzers or maybe the PA in a nightclub owned by Billy Fury and Ringo Starr.

Five-star hooks, king-size choruses and big, big melodies.

“If you’re from Scotland, the festival season is all about T In The Park – it’s the biggest, the brightest and the best.

“We’re thrilled to be added to a line-up that features acts like Arctic Monkeys, Paul Weller and Bombay Bicycle Club.

“In fact, you could say we’re over the moon …”

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10171713_789917444366481_6315117863527779249_nTisoki

An electronic producer who makes bass heavy dance music

“It means a lot to be chosen for T Break because it’s a brilliant platform for smaller acts to gain more recognition and a wider fanbase.”

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10177499_765731573460290_8377689270503180587_nTuff Love

Tuff Love are Julie, Suse and Michael – two girls and a dude from Glasgow who cut beautifully distorted guitar gems.

Their debut, Junk EP, is the sound of pure summer; dazzling, sun-streaked fuzz pop, with soft, burning melodies, and big smiling harmonies.

They’re like a DIY version of all the best bits of Electrelane crossed with early-MBV and a bit of Breeders swagger – and they’re gonna make your year a whole lot brighter.

“T in The Park was the first festival we went to when we were teenagers, and I never thought I’d play in a band that played at big events like that.

“It’s daunting because the T Break line up is really good this year and we’re in there with some bands who are killer live, but it’s very very exciting for us to have been picked and to be playing! Yahoooo!”

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1234366_620761931309792_1410196545_nVladimir

Rising out of the depths of Dundee and describing their sound as simply ‘bleak’, Vladimir burst onto the scene late last year and have quickly won themselves a reputation as one of Scotland’s most exciting new acts.

Emotionally heavy and sonically dense the four piece have become masters at crafting tightly wound layered fuzz and raw Dengler-era Interpol-esque rhythms.

“Its Great to be asked to play a festival we all grew up going to and watching on TV. “When we started this band we were playing to nobody in small pubs now we are going to be playing one of the biggest festivals in the UK.

“It’s not totally sunk in yet.”

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1489268_612992008748115_1061074658_nWe Came From Wolves

Jaggy rock/bastard pop from Perth, now based in Glasgow, We Came From Wolves have just returned from a UK tour, dates in France and Germany and sold out release shows supporting their EP Paradise Place.

“As T is in our home county of Perthshire, we have loads of memories of summers spent and bands watched at T.

“It has always felt like our home festival.

“We are so excited and can’t wait for the opportunity to play our music, on home soil for our first major festival appearance”